Equality before the Law vs. ‘Human Rights’

I read in the Telegraph today about a woman who has been told she can’t have planning permission to put a caravan on her organic vegetable garden to enable her to live near the plants she is growing. Fair enough, you might say.

However 20 miles from her garden a group of ‘travellers’ have bought a field, laid drains and built houses, all without planning permission – and no-one is doing anything to move them. It appears there’s guidance from the Association of Chief Police Officers that to remove them and their dwellings from the land would infringe their ‘human rights’.

If this story is true then we are a long way down the road to abandoning the Rule of Law  and the principle that all are equal before it favour of privilege (literally, ‘private law’) for minorities. which will bring the Law itself and those who enforce it into well merited contempt.

Similarly Newsnight reports that some people broke into a school in Notts. on Monday intent upon staging a ‘protest’ to disrupt the working of a nearby coal-fired power station. They were arrested but are complaining about being treated as if they were terrorists, when they wanted to ‘draw attention to the carbon emissions from the power station’. None of them have been charged, it seems. What about breaking and entering, for starters?

Again there seems to be a growing willingness to let the end (especially something greenish) justify the means used to ‘protest’ about it. This must stop!

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About pauljohnston

Elected as Conservative councillor in Surbiton Hill, Kingston upon Thames in 1998. Re-elected 2002 and 2006. Former parliamentary candidate in Lancashire and Birmingham. Ceased to be a Councillor (temporarily?) in 2010. Active among Residents' Associations in Surbiton Hill and among residents in social housing generally. Former teacher of History at St. Brendan's College Bristol and Head of History and Politics at the London Oratory School. Worked with Sutton Trust running summer schools for sixth formers at Oxford University from 1997-2000 aiming to improve uptake of places from pupils from state schools which sent very few applicants to Oxbridge.
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